Pop quiz: The Twitter-in-Chief’s tweets – Nasty or Meaningful?

By John Gascoyne

Pop quiz: Who is the biggest loser – the present occupier of the White who issues the mindless, mean-spirited tweets, or the audience – media and the public alike – who are suckered into reading and discussing them ad nauseum?

John Gascoyne is a writer and lawyer living in Fort Collins, Colo. Learn more about him…

My vote would go to the people – us and the media – as the biggest losers. Donald is trolling us and we fall into his web, needlessly, just about every day.

Mika, Joe, Chelsea, and Hillary have all been attacked by tRump recently. That nastiness, while hateful and spiteful, has no meaningful or valuable place in the national dialogue. These are all tough public figures who can look out for themselves. It just can’t matter how Mika and Joe respond or that Chelsea or her mom may have scored a zinger of a reply back to the Tweeter in Chief.

Don’t forget to take the short pop quiz at the end of this article.

Trump and his Twitterfingers have replaced baseball as the national addiction: we wake up to news agencies – TV and press – talking about the latest back-alley issuance as being worthy of dissemination and discussion. We get suckered into following the back-and-forth as if there must be some greater meaning.

There isn’t.

We are being played, badly, by a careless and uncaring person who substitutes pointless and nasty attacks for meaningful commentary.

There are ways to deal with this:

  • The media can all refrain from disseminating attack trash from the White House. They can, of course, cover legitimate political issuances, should there happen to be any.
  • We, the people, can urge media to begin acting like responsible news organizations rather than unwitting puppets.
  • As individuals, we can just ignore the silliness – following it, repeating it, or offering it any credence whatsoever.

One way to deal with this is to create a Bull-O-Meter Rating System. If a particular tweet is 25 percent, or less, pure Bull, and has national relevance, sure, go ahead and disseminate it. Contrariwise, if the tweet exceeds that amount of pure Bull, don’t do the Tweeter-in-Chief’s nasty business for him – don’t promulgate hate-filled, pointless speech.

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Twitter is Trump’s direct link to Americans to attack people, distribute lies

The results of an ABC/Washington Post poll released July 17 showed 67 percent of Americans disapprove of Donald Trump’s tweet. The poll also found that 68 percent said the tweets were inappropriate; 65 percent said they were insulting, and 52 percent said his tweets were dangerous. Read the USA Today article about the poll.

More than any other president, CEO or movie star, Trump has learned to use Twitter to his personal advantage, often with disregard for truth and dignity.

According to TwitterCounter.com, he averages eight tweets a day. As of July 13, @realDonaldTrump had 33,697,688 followers, ranking his account 31 for number of followers among all Twitter users. He has sent out 35,277 tweets since joining Twitter in 2009.

An extraordinarily high number of his tweets contain personal attacks on anyone who speaks critically of his politics, business tactics or morals. He also relies on Twitter to distribute lies and fake news: the size of the inaugural crowd, voter fraud was in the millions, to name just two examples. Here’s a look at his recent tweets.

 

Read a previous Writers With No Borders article about Trump’s tweets: Why Trump’s bait-and-switch tweets confuse Americans by Gary Kimsey.

 

Take the following pop quiz, please. We will report the results in the right narrow column of the next article posted by Writers With No Borders. 

Why Trump’s Bait-and-Switch Tweets Confuse Americans

By Gary Kimsey

In his use of Twitter, is President Trump performing a classic bait-and-switch scam to confuse Americans?

Well, yes, of course.

Gary Kimsey is a writer and retired marketing specialist. Learn more about him…

“Bait and switch” is a dishonest marketing tactic where consumers (we Americans in this case) are encouraged to believe something about a product (here, the product is Trump). The terrible truth is that the product is vastly different and of significantly less quality than what was promised. It’s often easy to identify a bait-and-switch maneuver. Thus, be wary when someone says, “Believe me”—a favored Trump expression.

I couldn’t help but think about bait-and-switch while watching the March 20 congressional hearing by the House Intelligence Committee. The hearing focused on hacking, Putin, cabinet members’ ties to Russia, and, of course, Trump’s crazy Twitter tweets claiming President Obama wiretapped Trump Tower. (I took the liberty of adding the word “crazy,” by the way, for his accusatory tweets were just that.

I found it interesting that Trump conducted a tweet storm as the hearing was underway. He used the official Twitter account of the President of the United States. More than 1.6 million Americans received the tweets.

These tweets contained partial truths, at best, as well as grossly misinterpreted accounts of what was said in the hearings. Predictably, this was the same fantasy pattern that many of his tweets have followed since the inauguration.

Click here for a fact-check on Trump’s tweets during the congressional hearing.

As a person who spent the last half of his 50-year professional career in marketing, I am well-aware that Trump—the quintessential marketer—fully operates on a certain assumption. Americans, especially those who voted for him, will unquestioningly believe information from such a traditionally respected source as a U.S. president.

Think back to your history and civics classes. Many of us were indoctrinated in high school and college classes to believe certain positions in America are above lying. The presidency is supposedly one of the sacred positions. For my generation of Baby Boomers, this myth of total truthfulness was shattered by Nixon.

Don’t forget to take the short survey at the end of this article.

The problem now is that many Americans don’t peer beyond tweets and eye-catching headlines. As a society, we are victims of 140 characters and information overload. Fake News is a stake aimed at our intellectual heart. We fear Fake News so much that many of us will believe, without questioning, a president who tweets “Fake News” whenever someone disagrees with him, whether it’s individuals, the media or intelligence agencies.

Trump knows our fears and plays upon them by telling us in his tweets—without presenting any evidence—that information from such reliable sources as the FBI is wrong. He also keeps the tweets coming as a way to divert the thoughts of Americans away from other issues—his denial of global warming, defunding Meals on Wheels and Planned Parenthood, appointing to his cabinet inept and incapable billionaire friends rather than experts, and the likely loss of health care for 24 million Americans, to name just a few issues. Rather than draining the swamp, Trump is filling it with moccasins and alligators.

The impacts of bait-and-switch in tweets? Many Americans have learned they are unable to trust the person sitting in the Oval Office. Strife is perpetuated in society and politics, continuing to divide the nation. The Office of the President of the United States—the world’s most powerful position—is belittled in the eyes of Americans, as well as people and governments around the world. Important issues are overshadowed. Democracy is undermined. Confusion reigns.

How do we avoid the bait-and-switch of Trump’s tweets? We must cast our vision beyond what we read in his tweets. Seek out at reliable sources. Fact-check information.

Here are reliable fact-checking sites:

Also look at The 10 Best Fact-checking Sites.

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