Pop quiz: The Twitter-in-Chief’s tweets – Nasty or Meaningful?

By John Gascoyne

Pop quiz: Who is the biggest loser – the present occupier of the White who issues the mindless, mean-spirited tweets, or the audience – media and the public alike – who are suckered into reading and discussing them ad nauseum?

John Gascoyne is a writer and lawyer living in Fort Collins, Colo. Learn more about him…

My vote would go to the people – us and the media – as the biggest losers. Donald is trolling us and we fall into his web, needlessly, just about every day.

Mika, Joe, Chelsea, and Hillary have all been attacked by tRump recently. That nastiness, while hateful and spiteful, has no meaningful or valuable place in the national dialogue. These are all tough public figures who can look out for themselves. It just can’t matter how Mika and Joe respond or that Chelsea or her mom may have scored a zinger of a reply back to the Tweeter in Chief.

Don’t forget to take the short pop quiz at the end of this article.

Trump and his Twitterfingers have replaced baseball as the national addiction: we wake up to news agencies – TV and press – talking about the latest back-alley issuance as being worthy of dissemination and discussion. We get suckered into following the back-and-forth as if there must be some greater meaning.

There isn’t.

We are being played, badly, by a careless and uncaring person who substitutes pointless and nasty attacks for meaningful commentary.

There are ways to deal with this:

  • The media can all refrain from disseminating attack trash from the White House. They can, of course, cover legitimate political issuances, should there happen to be any.
  • We, the people, can urge media to begin acting like responsible news organizations rather than unwitting puppets.
  • As individuals, we can just ignore the silliness – following it, repeating it, or offering it any credence whatsoever.

One way to deal with this is to create a Bull-O-Meter Rating System. If a particular tweet is 25 percent, or less, pure Bull, and has national relevance, sure, go ahead and disseminate it. Contrariwise, if the tweet exceeds that amount of pure Bull, don’t do the Tweeter-in-Chief’s nasty business for him – don’t promulgate hate-filled, pointless speech.

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Twitter is Trump’s direct link to Americans to attack people, distribute lies

The results of an ABC/Washington Post poll released July 17 showed 67 percent of Americans disapprove of Donald Trump’s tweet. The poll also found that 68 percent said the tweets were inappropriate; 65 percent said they were insulting, and 52 percent said his tweets were dangerous. Read the USA Today article about the poll.

More than any other president, CEO or movie star, Trump has learned to use Twitter to his personal advantage, often with disregard for truth and dignity.

According to TwitterCounter.com, he averages eight tweets a day. As of July 13, @realDonaldTrump had 33,697,688 followers, ranking his account 31 for number of followers among all Twitter users. He has sent out 35,277 tweets since joining Twitter in 2009.

An extraordinarily high number of his tweets contain personal attacks on anyone who speaks critically of his politics, business tactics or morals. He also relies on Twitter to distribute lies and fake news: the size of the inaugural crowd, voter fraud was in the millions, to name just two examples. Here’s a look at his recent tweets.

 

Read a previous Writers With No Borders article about Trump’s tweets: Why Trump’s bait-and-switch tweets confuse Americans by Gary Kimsey.

 

Take the following pop quiz, please. We will report the results in the right narrow column of the next article posted by Writers With No Borders.