“I want to stab him in the testicles a million times”

By Mary Roberts 

“What do you think we are? Cattle?”

I’m caught in a tight scree of human flesh, all pretending we aren’t pressed up against each other’s bodies — fleshy, rib thin, and somewhere in-between. Boston’s old subway cars weren’t meant to hold this many people. The cattle remark is in my head. I can’t say it. I’m afraid I’ll stutter or people would laugh at me.

That’s when it happens.

Before the 2016 presidential election, Mary Roberts wrote about real estate, her Irish Catholic childhood in Boston and the 13 dogs that have defined the chapters of her life. Now, she writes to say, “Wake up, people!” Learn more about Mary.

Someone reaches from behind me and slides his hand down the front on my pants. Both of my hands are gripping the overhead strap and my legs are parted to steady myself from the stops and starts of the jolting train.

“Hey!” I let go of the strap with my left arm and squeeze it between two of my neighbors but the hand is gone before I can grab it. It is 1970. I am 19. I burn in shame.

I had returned home after one year of college in New York. Home was Needham, a small town 10 miles west of Boston. Long island, N.Y., was not where I wanted to be. I didn’t know where I wanted to be. I had no plan or ambition, except to star in Broadway musicals but I was afraid to speak and couldn’t sing. I had also broken my kneecap twice in high school. My one year as a drama major ended in disaster when I couldn’t manage the role as Marat Sade’s mother. And she was a stutterer.

Mom’s friend got me a job in Medical Records at Children’s Hospital and I went to night school at Boston College. From the hospital, I took the Green Line to the BC stop. Three hours later, I’d head home to the Newton Highlands stop where I would take a bus to Needham Square. I didn’t drive and we didn’t have a car anyway, so the MBTA was my constant companion, riding its street cars and buses four times a day.

“I won’t do this anymore.”

I hated the way men looked at me when I’d make my way through the construction sites that littered the streets and sidewalks along the way. I’d veer out to the road followed by the whistles and calls for blow jobs from the guys with hard hats. I wore glasses, no makeup and baggy turtlenecks with the mandatory skirts but it didn’t matter. I was young.

After the subway incident, I went in to the manager’s office and told her I was done. “I can’t do this anymore,” I told her, “I won’t do this anymore.”

Two weeks later, on New Year’s Eve, 1970, I was on an airplane with my sister who was headed back to Colorado State University after Christmas break. She and I were never the best friends we should have been, only 18 months apart, but it was better than spending the rest of my life terrified of crowds and the subway. I was already unable to drive after a traumatizing car accident. A good sturdy bike would get me where I needed to go in Colorado.

“A bloated, orange-tinted mass of pulpy flesh”

Forty plus years later and Donald Trump is caught saying ‘grab them by the pussy’ and I am outraged. More than outraged.

I am indignant, incensed, I am horrified. In my dreams, I want to stab him in the heart and testicles a million times then write my name — and the names of all women who have been assaulted, grabbed, diminished, denigrated — in his blood as it slowly leaves his body, leaving a bloated, orange-tinted mass off pulpy flesh and pockmarked bone. Again, fantasies in my dream land, not for advocating violence against a president or anyone.

Does such a dream make me a terrorist? Did I break the law by entertaining fantasies of hurting the president?

I don’t harbor those fantasies because I disagree with his policies (which I do) or think that he is a disgrace as a president and a human being (which I do). I harbor those fantasies because he is a predator and a sexual bully. Every woman knows what that is and the women who voted for him have neatly compartmentalized that fact somewhere in their emotional body where it will fester and eventually destroy them.

“Was I that fragile?”

At 65 years of age, I now understand that I left Boston because someone grabbed me by the pussy. I left behind the love of my life, the ocean, my mother, the home I was raised in and the New England I still yearn for—just because an asshole grabbed me and I felt powerless and ashamed and scared that it would happen again.

Was I that fragile? Was I that sorry-ass wimp of a girl? Without the backbone to give the construction guys the finger and yell ‘fuck you’ back at them? Without the courage to call out ‘help’ in the subway car? Yes, I was.

Years later, I hug my dogs tight when I hear the President’s voice over the radio. I’m already considering a replacement for the third dog I just lost to a painful disease. Two is good but three — three is impenetrable.

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Recklessly gambling with our children’s future

By Alan Apt

The Webster dictionary definition of Conservative and Conservator is someone who will be a protector or guardian and will tend to preserve established traditions.

Alan Apt is a modest person who downplays his many accomplishments as a writer, environmentalist, politician, and volunteer. Learn more about Alan.

The truly conservative Republican Parties of Teddy Roosevelt, Richard Nixon, and even Ronald Reagan supported the preservation of public lands and the protection of our air and water.

The current GOP attacks on public land, and on the protection of clean air and water redefines the party as radicals who are disregarding established values. Too many fossil fuel state Democrats are also following suit. They are ignoring 70 to 80 percent of all Americans, including Republicans, who support public lands and environmental rules.

Ninety-seven percent of climate scientists say the climate is changing rapidly because of enormous increases in atmospheric carbon in the 19th and 20th centuries. Even if you believe it is part of a natural cycle, it should not be difficult to agree with scientists who say that human pollution is accelerating the unprecedented rate of change.

Former Republican officials from the Reagan and Bush administrations, George Schultz and Howard Baker, have begged Congress and Trump to implement a carbon tax on industry to slow emissions—and then give the taxes back to taxpayers—while rolling back Obama’s regulations on carbon emissions.

The Republican Congress simply wants to roll back the Obama emission measures on coal, slowing the transition to cleaner fuels.

Would a true conservative gamble with the future of our climate, coastlines, water supply, and ability to grow enough food?

I think most true conservatives are not gamblers, but would at least hedge their bets by backing badly needed clean energy jobs and the training to make them accessible to out-of-work coal miners and oil drillers. One in five new jobs is created by wind and solar energy.

Wall Street is also betraying our future by continuing to disproportionately fund fossil fuels, instead of renewable energy and the millions of more jobs that could be created.

Most unbiased scientists say we are recklessly gambling with our children’s and grandchildren’s future. They remind us how a non-partisan effort saved the ozone layer by banning damaging chemicals. A healthy clean-energy, job-abundant economy could make true conservatives out of all of us.

###

What can we do? Here are important steps to take:

  • Become active in the Sierra ClubWilderness Society, Earthjustice, and other organizations concerned about the environment.
  • Learn more. Here are articles to start with:  TimeEsquire; and Scientific American.
  • Speak out. Visit, call and write your U.S. representatives and senators, and encourage your friends to do the same. Earthjustice and other organizations have websites where help is available for making phone calls and writing letters.

Welcome to a new blog that maps a positive course through America’s perilous times

Concerned American writers have joined together to create this new blog, Writers With No Borders, to offer their thoughts on how to steer our nation through perilous times.

The writers aren’t the media elite who receive so much criticism these days. Instead, they are your neighbors, the person you might meet in a coffee shop or tavern, the guy who drives an old car, and the lady who frets over trying to be the superwoman that society claims should be able to do everything. They are like you.

The author of this blog post is Gary Kimsey, a writer who lives in Missouri in the winter and Colorado in the summer. Learn more about him…

Solve problems: These writers have several things in common: They see danger now and ahead for our country and the world. They like to write about current issues. What they have to say is important. Their views will focus on challenges faced by Americans and action that can be taken to solve problems. logo_fina_150pixels

I’ll be one of the writers. I picked up my pen—well, that is, I sat down at my computer—because it’s my view we have plunged into dangerous times politically, environmentally and socially.

Danger for the United States has existed at various levels since 1776, but now the perilous times have been incredibly heightened by Donald Trump, his tweets and his controversial orders. Regardless of whether you voted for him, you surely must be concerned, too, about what has happened since the inauguration.

As a rule, I’m apolitical. I believe everyone has a right to vote as they believe and that all of us should abide by the results. I’m a registered independent and I vote for the person, not the party. I follow news closely. I prefer to watch and read about answers rather than problems. Nonetheless, and I dislike pointing this out, here’s what I’ve seen and what I think:

After spending less than two weeks in office, the president has lied about the size of the inauguration crowd, committed to building a wall of questionable value that will cost taxpayers billions of dollars; muzzled the EPA; tried to bully Australia, one of America’s longest and most faithful friends; angered Mexicans to the point where they are boycotting U.S. goods embraced Putin, ignored Russia’s new military thrust againt Ukraine; alienated countries around the world by banning Muslims; enhanced the recruiting capabilities of ISIS; threatened a respected university where protests occurred on February 1; insulted the CIA and other intelligence agencies; and harshly warned the sovereign countries of the United Nations not to take views that oppose the U.S. Don’t believe this last point? Consider the message offered last week by Nikki Haley, Trump’s United Nations ambassador: “For those that don’t have our back, we’re taking names.”

A couple of days ago one of my friends posted a link on Facebook that went to a USA Today article with this headline: Analysis: Trump’s start creates chaos by doing what he promised. My friend added this to his post: “By doing what he promised. Were people not listening?!?” He meant, of course, when they voted for him.

To get worse: I replied back to my friend: “People were listening, but I suspect many didn’t believe he actually would do such insanely dangerous things. And we’re only days into his administration. Listen to this: It will get worse.”

Millions of people have already marched in protest of Trump. Thousands demonstrate daily. Peace is likely to give way to violence, unfortunately. On January 31, in what I suspect may be an opening salvo to more violent protests, police used pepper gas to disperse unruly protesters in Ohio.

Listen to this: It will get worse. I pray that I’m wrong.

Look for diverse views and topics from Writers With No Borders

In future posts of Writers With No Borders, writers will at times focus on Trump, but they will also venture into such topics as global warming, women’s rights, religious freedom, health care, jobs, the economy, public education, immigration, renewable energy, oil, hacking, congress, terrorism, nuclear weapons, and, among others, political swamps.

Diversity of views is good thing for our society. It’s a large part of the foundation upon which America was built upon and is nourished. That’s what this blog is all about: diversity of views. It is the reason we’ve asked a variety of writers to offer their opinions and solutions.

Time for regular folks: This blog was also developed as a way to step over and beyond the power elite, the political elite, the economic elite: They can’t agree on any ideas or feasible solutions. It’s time for regular folks to take the lead.

Regardless of where you on the proverbial political aisle, now is the time to stay abreast of issues. Join political groups. Join environmental organizations. Speak your views. Look beyond Facebook and Twitter headlines. Stay peaceful.

Read news, editorials and analysis offered by quality news organizations. Research to find the truth. Verify information by going to reputable sites like FactCheck.org and Snopes.org.

Keep track of what your local and national politicians are doing. Email them. Tweet them. Call them. Go old style: Write them letters. Better yet, visit their offices. Take your views to them. Send us your views, too. And, again, stay peaceful.

Now is the time.

Follow Writers With No Borders by email by clicking on the follow icon at the top of the right column.

 

 

Welcome to a new blog that maps a positive course through America’s perilous times

Concerned American writers have joined together to create this new blog, Writers With No Borders, to offer their thoughts on how to steer our nation through perilous times.

The writers aren’t the media elite who receive so much criticism these days. Instead, they are your neighbors, the person you might meet in a coffee shop or tavern, the guy who drives an old car, and the lady who frets over trying to be the superwoman that society claims should be able to do everything. They are like you.

The author of this blog post is Gary Kimsey, a writer who lives in Missouri. Learn more about him…

Solve problems: These writers have several things in common: They see danger now and ahead for our country and the world. They like to write about current issues. What they have to say is important. Their views will focus on challenges faced by Americans and action that can be taken to solve problems. logo_fina_150pixels

I’ll be one of the writers. I picked up my pen—well, that is, I sat down at my computer—because it’s my view we have plunged into dangerous times politically, environmentally and socially.

Danger for the United States has existed at various levels since 1776, but now the perilous times have been incredibly heightened by Donald Trump, his tweets and his controversial orders. Regardless of whether you voted for him, you surely must be concerned, too, about what has happened since the inauguration.

As a rule, I’m apolitical. I believe everyone has a right to vote as they believe and that all of us should abide by the results. I’m a registered independent and I vote for the person, not the party. I follow news closely. I prefer to watch and read about answers rather than problems. Nonetheless, and I dislike pointing this out, here’s what I’ve seen and what I think:

After spending less than two weeks in office, the president has lied about the size of the inauguration crowd, committed to building a wall of questionable value that will cost taxpayers from $15 billion to $40 billion, muzzled the EPA, stuck a spike in the heart of America’s friendship with Mexico, embraced Putin, alienated countries around the world by banning Muslims, enhanced the recruiting capabilities of ISIS, and threatened the United Nations. Don’t believe this last point? Consider the message offered last week by Nikki Haley, Trump’s United Nations ambassador: “For those that don’t have our back, we’re taking names.”

A couple of days ago one of my friends posted a link on Facebook that went to a USA Today article with this headline: Analysis: Trump’s start creates chaos by doing what he promised. My friend added this to his post: “By doing what he promised. Were people not listening?!?” He meant, of course, when they voted for him.

To get worse: I replied back to my friend: “People were listening, but I suspect many didn’t believe he actually would do such insanely dangerous things. And we’re only days into his administration. Listen to this: It will get worse.”

Millions of people have already marched in protest of Trump. Thousands demonstrate daily. Peace is likely to give way to violence, unfortunately. Yesterday, in what I suspect may be an opening salvo to more violent protests, police used pepper gas to disperse unruly protesters in Ohio.

Listen to this: It will get worse. I pray that I’m wrong.

Look for diverse views and topics from Writers With No Borders

In future posts of Writers With No Borders, writers will at times focus on Trump, but they will also venture into such topics as global warming, women’s rights, religious freedom, health care, jobs, the economy, public education, immigration, renewable energy, oil, hacking, congress, terrorism, nuclear weapons, and, among others, political swamps.

Diversity of views is good thing for our society. It’s a large part of the foundation upon which America was built upon and is nourished. That’s what this blog is all about: diversity of views. It is the reason we’ve asked a variety of writers to offer their opinions and solutions.

Time for regular folks: This blog was also developed as a way to step over and beyond the power elite, the political elite, the economic elite: They can’t agree on any ideas or feasible solutions. It’s time for regular folks to take the lead.

Regardless of where you on the proverbial political aisle, now is the time to stay abreast of issues. Join political groups. Join environmental organizations. Speak your views. Look beyond Facebook and Twitter headlines. Stay peaceful.

Read news, editorials and analysis offered by quality news organizations. Research to find the truth. Verify information by going to reputable sites like FactCheck.org and Snopes.org.

Keep track of what your local and national politicians are doing. Email them. Tweet them. Call them. Go old style: Write them letters. Better yet, visit their offices. Take your views to them. Send us your views, too. And, again, stay peaceful.

Now is the time.

Upcoming: In the next post of Writers With No Borders, Bear Jack Gebhardt, a writer in Colorado, will focus on how to nourish your life and your soul while putting up a resistance to today’s tangled problems. Watch for his post on February 1.

Subscribe to this blog by clicking on the “Follow” button in the right column.